Tinfish 2019 Collection

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Tinfish 2019 Collection
Sale $75 (25% OFF retail $101)

 
Books

MAGA

by Timothy Dyke • 2019 • 60 pages

Tim Dyke has a neighbor who loves Trump, and Tim Dyke tried to talk to him. The event did not end well. So he energetically sublimated his asexual gay male rage into this virtuosic and obsessive book, each of whose words begins with an M or an A or a G or an A, and in that order. Like a perverse and be-pompommed cheerleader, Dyke systematically unravels Trump’s slogan about making America great again, reveling over the course of dozens of pages in the poetic gift of a dangerous brand offered to him above the sullen brims of red caps. In this work, form destroys the original intended content with hilarious, angry angst.

Witness in the Convex Mirror

by Eileen R. Tabios • 2019 • 150 pages

When John Ashbery died in September, 2017, all the obituaries noted that he had been a member of the New York School of poets, that his roots were in western New York and that, despite living for a decade in Paris, his career had unfolded over many decades in the City. Ashbery was, indeed, something of a local poet, constantly using references from the places he had lived. Lost in the very local memorials, however, was the fact that Ashbery’s work also influenced writers in the Pacific, including writers of color. Eileen Tabios has taken up Ashbery’s influence and engaged in a project of “the browning of John Ashbery,” as she told Tinfish’s editor once. Using one or two lines at a time from Ashbery’s “Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror,” (1976), Tabios inhabits Ashbery’s mode, while moving our focus of attention many thousands of miles west of New York City. Tabios, who grew up in the Philippines, studied and worked in New York City, and has lived in California for many years, appropriates Ashbery to her own ends. These include cultural appropriation, genocide, militarism, sexual and racial violence, art history, and many other interests she shared—or did not share—with the older white male poet. Witness in the Convex Mirror is a tense act of homage, one that draws Ashbery away from the region that is most comfortable with him, and into a place where the discomfort is palpable, but extremely generative.

Ashbery Mode

Edited by Michael Farrell • 2019 • 130 pages

To rehearse the description of Eileen R. Tabios’s Witness in the Convex Mirror:

“When John Ashbery died in September, 2017, the obituaries noted that he had been a member of the New York School of poets, that his roots were in western New York State, and that, despite living for over a decade in Paris, his career had unfolded over many years in the City. Ashbery was, indeed, something of a local poet, constantly using references from the places he had lived. Lost in the very local memorials, however, was the fact that Ashbery’s work also influenced writers in the Pacific, including writers of color.”

When the editor of Tinfish Press wrote on a Facebook comment stream that she was interested in publishing work from the Pacific that responded to Ashbery’s poetry, she did not expect Michael Farrell to respond that he already had such a manuscript in hand. Ashbery Mode is that precise anthology, one that includes dozens of Australia’s best contemporary poets writing in the “mode” of Ashbery. Like his New York School colleague and friend, Frank O’Hara, Ashbery proved crucial in relaxing the strictures of Australian poetry, releasing it from its formal and tonal bonds. It’s wonderful to see Ashbery transmogrify into a local Australian poet. This book is a companion piece to Tabios’s Witness in the Convex Mirror and, like her book, shows how poetic influence gets activated across national and oceanic boundaries, as well as how source texts can open up into radically new perspectives.

Luminous Ruse

By Paul Naylor • 2019 • 118 pages

In Luminous Ruse, Paul Naylor asks, “Who could suture the wounds we become / in this diaphanous life divided as time?” The poet’s answer has a lot to do with his being father to a young daughter whose sharp questions punctuate the book like koans. That she is growing up in a world dominated by Capital, environmental degradation, and other American ills, drives this long poem-sequence; the poems push outward in longer lines, then pull inward in shorter ones, like a long meditative breath.

 
Chapbooks

The Birth of Thread

By Julieta Marchant Translated by Thomas Rothe • 2019

The threads that weave together in this meditative poem are threads that sew together grandmother, mother, poet, daughter. Then there are hands, chestnuts, memory, names, poem (what is it, and why are you writing about yourself in the third person?)and then back to grandmother, mother, poet, daughter. The text is presented as translated by Thomas Roche, and then in its original form written by Julieta Marchant. This is Tinfish Press’s first chapbook translation from Pacific (Chilean) Spanish.

Memba When

By Brooke Elyse Jones • 2019

Brooke Elyse Jones has written a hybrid prose poetic text in Pidgin (HCE) about teen girls in Kahuku, on the North Shore of O`ahu, as they confront the big issues of sex, pregnancy, loss, and death. Memba When fits into the tradition of Pidgin literature in Hawai`i, entering a literary genealogy that includes work by Lisa Linn Kanae, No`u Revilla and others. Jones is also a fiction writer and a Shakespearean actor. She puts all these skills to use in Memba When, her first book.


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